EMPLOYMENT LAW EDINBURGH

Do you need to speak to a specialist employment lawyer in Edinburgh?

nowinnofee 500 Finalist1

 

Contact Us

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Invalid Input
What type of help do you need? Invalid Input

Pick tick to confirm you have read this.
Anti-spam Verification(*)
Invalid Input

Employment Lawyers Edinburgh

For advice on all aspects of employment law, contact us today.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
Posted by on in Sex Discrimination
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 1097
  • 0 Comments

Calls for more action to increase female non-execs

The appointment of women to FTSE 350-listed non-executive director roles is being held back by selection processes which ultimately favour candidates with similar characteristics to existing male-dominated board members, according to a new report released by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The report, produced by Cranfield School of Management, is the first in-depth study into the appointment process to corporate boards and the role of executive search firms (ESFs). It follows the recent Davies Review which called upon ESFs to take on a more active role in increasing gender diversity on FTSE boards.

The report reveals a recognition by many chairmen and search firms that gender diversity should be increased at board level. Search firms have introduced a voluntary code of conduct and had some success at getting more women on long lists. But when it comes to shortlisting and appointing, the candidates who are selected tend to be those who are perceived as “fitting in" with the values, norms and behaviours of existing board members, who are largely men.

Baroness Prosser, deputy chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission said:

“Research shows that diverse boards produce better performance. Many companies recognise this and we commissioned this report to support their efforts to improve the representation of women at board level. However, the often subjective way appointments are made ends up replicating existing boards rather than bringing in the talented women who could bring real benefit to individual company performance and ultimately help Britain’s economic recovery.”

Comments

 

COVID-19 update

We are open for business and here to help you.

Our team are working from home but remain fully available to assist you.

Please get in touch today.